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 Total numbers

Population: All people, male and female, child and adult, living in a given geographic area.

Total households: A household includes all of the people who occupy a housing unit. A housing unit is a house, apartment, or mobile home. The occupants may be a single family, one person living alone, two or more families living together, or any other group of related or unrelated people who share living quarters. People living in group quarters are not considered to be living in households. Group quarters includes institutions such as prisons, military barracks, nursing homes, and juvenile institutions.

Family households: A family includes a head of household and one or more other people living in the same household who are related to the householder by birth, marriage, or adoption. All people in a household who are related to the householder are regarded as members of his or her family. A household can contain only one family for purposes of census tabulations. Not all households contain families since a household may be a group of unrelated people or one person living alone.

Gender

Female: The percent of the total population that is female. Individuals were asked to mark either “male” or “female” to indicate their sex.

Male: The percent of the total population that is male. Individuals were asked to mark either “male” or “female” to indicate their sex.

Age

5 years old and under: The percent of the total population that is 5 years old or younger. The age classification is based on the age of the person in complete years as of April 1 of the Census year.

6-11 years old: The percent of the total population that is 6 to 11 years old. The age classification is based on the age of the person in complete years as of April 1 of the Census year.

12-17 years old: The percent of the total population that is 12 to 17 years old. The age classification is based on the age of the person in complete years as of April 1 of the Census year.

18-34 years old: The percent of the total population that is 18 to 34 years old. The age classification is based on the age of the person in complete years as of April 1 of the Census year.

35-49 years old: The percent of the total population that is 35 to 49 years old. The age classification is based on the age of the person in complete years as of April 1 of the Census year.

50-64 years old: The percent of the total population that is 50 to 64 years old. The age classification is based on the age of the person in complete years as of April 1 of the Census year.

65-74 years old: The percent of the total population that is 65 to 74 years old. The age classification is based on the age of the person in complete years as of April 1 of the Census year.

75-84 years old: The percent of the total population that is 75 to 84 years old. The age classification is based on the age of the person in complete years as of April 1 of the Census year.

85 years old and older: The percent of the total population that is 85 years old or older. The age classification is based on the age of the person in complete years as of April 1 of the Census year.

Racial & ethnic diversity

Black or African American: The percent of the total population who indicate they consider their race to be “Black, African Am., or Negro.” This percent does not include African Americans who checked “yes” for Hispanic or who checked “yes” for more than one race. It does include those that wrote in entries such as Afro American, Kenyan, Nigerian, or Haitian.

White: The percent of the total population who indicate they consider their race to be “White.” This percent does not include whites who checked “yes” for Hispanic or who checked “yes” for more than one race. It does include those that wrote in entries such as English, French, Polish, Lebanese, or Arab.

Asian: The percent of the total population who indicate they consider their race to be “Asian Indian,” “Chinese,” “Filipino,” “Korean,” “Japanese,” “Vietnamese,” and “Other Asian.” This percent does not include Asians who checked “yes” for Hispanic or who checked “yes” for more than one race. It does include those that wrote in entries such as Thai, Laotian, Pakistani, or Indian.

American Indian: The percent of the total population who indicate they consider their race to be “American Indian or Alaska Native” or wrote in the name of their Indian tribe. This percent does not include those who checked “yes” for Hispanic or who checked “yes” for more than one race.

Other: The percent of the total population who indicate they consider their race to only be “Some other race.” It includes those that wrote in entries such as multiracial, mixed, or interracial. Respondents who identified with “Native Hawaiian and Other Pacific Islander” were included in this percentage because the numbers were so few in the greater New Orleans area. This percent does not include those who checked “yes” for Hispanic or who checked “yes” for more than one race.

2 race categories: The percent of the total population who indicate they consider their race to be a combination of two or more of the following race categories: 1) Black, 2) White, 3) American Indian or Alaska Native, 4) Asian, 5) Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander, and 6) Some other race. This percent does not include those who checked “yes” for Hispanic.

Hispanic (any race): The percent of the total population who indicate they consider themselves to be “Mexican, Mexican Am., Chicano,” “Puerto Rican,” “Cuban” or “Other Spanish/Hispanic/Latino.” (The Data Center combined ethnicity data with race data so “Hispanic” is comparable to race categories such as “White.” To avoid double-counting people, anybody who checked “Spanish/Hispanic/Latino” under ethnicity was removed from whatever race category they also checked and put into the new category of “Hispanic or Latino (all races).” So, for example, if someone checked “White” as their race and “Hispanic” as their ethnicity, we removed them from the count of “White” people and included them in our new racial category of “Hispanic or Latino.”)

Households by type

Total households: A household includes all of the people who occupy a housing unit. A housing unit is a house, apartment, or mobile home. The occupants may be a single family, one person living alone, two or more families living together, or any other group of related or unrelated people who share living quarters. People living in group quarters are not considered to be living in households. Group quarters includes institutions such as prisons, military barracks, nursing homes, and juvenile institutions.

Female householder (no husband present) with children under 18: The percent of total households that consist of a female head of household with children under 18 years of age related to her by birth, marriage (a stepchild), or adoption, with no husband present.

Male householder (no wife present) with children under 18: The percent of total households that consist of a male head of household with children under 18 years of age related to him by birth, marriage (a stepchild), or adoption, with no wife present.

Married-couple family, with children under 18: The percent of total households that consist of a married couple with children under 18 years of age related to the head of household by birth, marriage (a stepchild), or adoption.

Nonfamily households, with children under 18: The percent of total households that consist of a head of household living with children under 18 years of age not related to the head of household by birth, marriage (a stepchild), or adoption.

Households with no people under 18 years: The percent of total households that have no children under 18 years of age.

Children in households

Population under 18 years in households: Total number of persons age 17 and under living in households.

Children living as head of household: The percent of the total population under 18 years of age in households who reported being the householder. In most cases, the householder is the person, or one of the people, in whose name the home is owned, being bought, or rented. If there is no such person in the household, any household member 15 years old or over could be designated as the householder.

Children living with mother only: The percent of the total population under 18 years of age in households who live with their mother, with no husband present.

Children living with father only: The percent of the total population under 18 years of age in households who live with their father, with no wife present.

Children living with married parents: The percent of the total population under 18 years of age in households who live with married parents.

Children living with grandparents: The percent of the total population under 18 years of age in households who live with a grandparent head of household.

Children living with other relatives: The percent of the total population under 18 years of age in households who live with a head of household who is a relative but not a parent or grandparent. Examples include brother, sister, aunt, cousin, etc.

Children living with non-relatives: The percent of the total population under 18 years of age in households who live with a head of household who is a non-relative. Examples include foster parent, unmarried partner, housemate, etc.

Elderly in households

Elderly in households: Total number of persons age 65 and over living in households.

Living alone: The percent of the total population age 65 and over in households who live alone.

Living in family households: The percent of the total population age 65 and over in households who live with one or more people related to him or her by birth, marriage, or adoption.

Living in nonfamily households: The percent of the total population age 65 and over in households who live with non-relatives. Examples include unmarried partner, housemate, foster child, etc.

Occupancy status

Total housing units: The total number of housing units. A housing unit may be a house, an apartment, a mobile home or trailer, a group of rooms, or a single room occupied as separate living quarters, or if vacant, intended for occupancy as separate living quarters. Separate living quarters are those in which the occupants live separately from any other individuals in the building and which have direct access from outside the building or through a common hall.

Occupied housing units: The percent of total housing units that are occupied. A housing unit is occupied if it is the usual place of residence of the person or group of people living in it at the time of enumeration or if the occupants are only temporarily absent; that is, away on vacation or business.

Vacant housing units: The percent of total housing units that are vacant. A housing unit is vacant if no one is living in it at the time of enumeration, unless its occupants are only temporarily absent. Units temporarily occupied at the time of enumeration entirely by people who have a usual residence elsewhere are classified as vacant. New units not yet occupied are classified as vacant housing units if construction has reached a point where all exterior windows and doors are installed and final usable floors are in place. Vacant units are excluded from the housing inventory if they are open to the elements; that is, the roof, walls, windows, and/or doors no longer protect the interior from the elements. Also excluded are vacant units with a sign that they are condemned or they are to be demolished.

Renters and owners

Total occupied housing units: The total number of housing units that are occupied. A housing unit is occupied if it is the usual place of residence of the person or group of people living in it at the time of enumeration or if the occupants are only temporarily absent; that is, away on vacation or business.

Owner occupied: The percent of total occupied housing units that are owner occupied. A housing unit is owner occupied if the owner or co-owner lives in the unit.

Renter occupied: The percent of total occupied housing units that are renter occupied. All occupied housing units that are not owner occupied, whether they are rented for cash rent or occupied without payment of cash rent, are classified as renter occupied.

Mortgage status

Owned with a mortgage or a loan: The percent of total owner-occupied housing units that are owned with a mortgage. “Mortgage” refers to all forms of debt where the property is pledged as security for repayment of the debt, including deeds of trust; contracts to purchase; second mortgages; and home equity loans. A housing unit is owner occupied if the owner or co-owner lives in the unit.

Owned free and clear: The percent of total owner-occupied housing units that are owned with no mortgage or other similar debt on the house, apartment, or mobile home including units built on leased land if the unit is owned outright without a mortgage. A housing unit is owner occupied if the owner or co-owner lives in the unit.

Average rental cost (in 2014 dollars)

Average contract rent: The total contract rent for all renter-occupied housing units paying cash rent in this area, divided by the total number of renter-occupied housing units paying cash rent in this area. Contract rent is the monthly rent agreed to or contracted for, regardless of any furnishings, utilities, fees, meals, or services that may be included.

Average gross rent: The total gross rent for all renter-occupied housing units paying cash rent in this area, divided by the total number of renter-occupied housing units paying cash rent in this area. Gross rent is the contract rent (the monthly rent agree to or contracted for with or without utilities or other services) plus the estimated average monthly cost of utilities (electricity, gas, water and sewer) and fuels (oil, coal, kerosene, wood, etc.) if these are paid by the renter (or paid for the renter by someone else). Gross rent is intended to eliminate differentials that result from varying practices with respect to the inclusion of utilities and fuels as part of the rental payment.

Housing affordability by owner/renter status

Owner occupied paying 30% or more of income on housing: The percent of total owner-occupied housing units that pay selected monthly owner costs totaling 30% or more of their household income. A housing unit is owner occupied if the owner or co-owner lives in the unit. Selected monthly owner costs are the sum of payments for mortgages, deeds of trust, contracts to purchase, or similar debts on the property (including payments for the first mortgage, second mortgage, home equity loans, and other junior mortgages); real estate taxes; fire, hazard, and flood insurance on the property; utilities (electricity, gas, and water and sewer); and fuels (oil, coal, kerosene, wood, etc.). It also includes, where appropriate, the monthly condominium fees or mobile home costs (installment loan payments, personal property taxes, site rent, registration fees, and license fees). Household income includes the income of the householder and all other individuals 15 years old and over in the household.

Renter occupied paying 30% or more of income on housing: The percent of total renter-occupied housing units that pay gross rent totaling 30% or more of their household income. Gross rent is the rent plus the estimated average monthly cost of utilities and fuels if these are paid by the renter. Household income includes the income of the householder and all other individuals 15 years old and over in the household.

Household income type

Wage or salary income: The percent of total households that reported receiving wages, salary, commissions, bonuses, or tips. This includes wages and salaries of the householder or any individuals 15 years old and over in the household.

Self-employment income: The percent of total households that reported receiving self-employment income from own nonfarm businesses or farm businesses, including proprietorships and partnerships. This includes self-employment income of the householder or any individuals 15 years old and over in the household.

Interest, dividends, or net rental income: The percent of total households that reported receiving interest, dividends, or net rental income. This includes interest, dividends, or net rental income of the householder or any individuals 15 years old and over in the household.

Social Security income: The percent of total households that reported receiving social security benefits or railroad retirement insurance checks. This includes such benefits received by the householder or any individuals 15 years old and over in the household.

Supplemental security income: The percent of total households that reported receiving supplementary security income. This includes supplementary security income received by the householder or any individuals 15 years old and over in the household.

Public assistance income: The percent of total households that reported receiving any public assistance or welfare payments from the state or local welfare office. This includes public assistance payments received by the householder or any individuals 15 years old and over in the household. Retirement income: The percent of total households that reported retirement income other than Social Security. This includes retirement income of the householder or any individuals 15 years old and over in the household.

Other types of income: The percent of total households that reported receiving all other types of income including unemployment compensation, Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) payments, alimony and child support, contributions received periodically from people not living in the household, military family allotments, and other kinds of periodic income other than earnings. This includes other types of income of the householder or any individuals 15 years old and over in the household.

Average household income (in 2014 dollars)

Average household income: The total income for all households in this area divided by the number of households in this area.

Income distribution

Less than $10,000: The percent of total households that reported less than $10,000 total income in 1999 or in the previous 12 months prior to filling out the survey between 2010 and 2014. Household income includes the income of the householder and all other individuals 15 years old and over in the household, whether they are related to the householder or not. “Total income” is the sum of the amounts reported separately for wage or salary income; net self-employment income; interest, dividends, or net rental or royalty income or income from estates and trusts; social security or railroad retirement income; Supplemental Security Income (SSI); public assistance or welfare payments; retirement, survivor, or disability pensions; and all other income.

$10,000-14,999: The percent of total households that reported $10,000 to $14,999 total income in 1999 or in the previous 12 months prior to filling out the survey between 2010 and 2014. Household income includes the income of the householder and all other individuals 15 years old and over in the household, whether they are related to the householder or not. “Total income” is the sum of the amounts reported separately for wage or salary income; net self-employment income; interest, dividends, or net rental or royalty income or income from estates and trusts; social security or railroad retirement income; Supplemental Security Income (SSI); public assistance or welfare payments; retirement, survivor, or disability pensions; and all other income.

$15,000-19,999: The percent of total households that reported $15,000 to $19,999 total income in 1999 or in the previous 12 months prior to filling out the survey between 2010 and 2014. Household income includes the income of the householder and all other individuals 15 years old and over in the household, whether they are related to the householder or not. “Total income” is the sum of the amounts reported separately for wage or salary income; net self-employment income; interest, dividends, or net rental or royalty income or income from estates and trusts; social security or railroad retirement income; Supplemental Security Income (SSI); public assistance or welfare payments; retirement, survivor, or disability pensions; and all other income.

$20,000-24,999: The percent of total households that reported $20,000 to $24,999 total income in 1999 or in the previous 12 months prior to filling out the survey between 2010 and 2014. Household income includes the income of the householder and all other individuals 15 years old and over in the household, whether they are related to the householder or not. “Total income” is the sum of the amounts reported separately for wage or salary income; net self-employment income; interest, dividends, or net rental or royalty income or income from estates and trusts; social security or railroad retirement income; Supplemental Security Income (SSI); public assistance or welfare payments; retirement, survivor, or disability pensions; and all other income.

$25,000-29,999: The percent of total households that reported $25,000 to $29,999 total income in 1999 or in the previous 12 months prior to filling out the survey between 2010 and 2014. Household income includes the income of the householder and all other individuals 15 years old and over in the household, whether they are related to the householder or not. “Total income” is the sum of the amounts reported separately for wage or salary income; net self-employment income; interest, dividends, or net rental or royalty income or income from estates and trusts; social security or railroad retirement income; Supplemental Security Income (SSI); public assistance or welfare payments; retirement, survivor, or disability pensions; and all other income.

$30,000-34,999: The percent of total households that reported $30,000 to $34,999 total income in 1999 or in the previous 12 months prior to filling out the survey between 2010 and 2014. Household income includes the income of the householder and all other individuals 15 years old and over in the household, whether they are related to the householder or not. “Total income” is the sum of the amounts reported separately for wage or salary income; net self-employment income; interest, dividends, or net rental or royalty income or income from estates and trusts; social security or railroad retirement income; Supplemental Security Income (SSI); public assistance or welfare payments; retirement, survivor, or disability pensions; and all other income.

$35,000-39,999: The percent of total households that reported $35,000 to $39,999 total income in 1999 or in the previous 12 months prior to filling out the survey between 2010 and 2014. Household income includes the income of the householder and all other individuals 15 years old and over in the household, whether they are related to the householder or not. “Total income” is the sum of the amounts reported separately for wage or salary income; net self-employment income; interest, dividends, or net rental or royalty income or income from estates and trusts; social security or railroad retirement income; Supplemental Security Income (SSI); public assistance or welfare payments; retirement, survivor, or disability pensions; and all other income.

$40,000-44,999: The percent of total households that reported $40,000 to $44,999 total income in 1999 or in the previous 12 months prior to filling out the survey between 2010 and 2014. Household income includes the income of the householder and all other individuals 15 years old and over in the household, whether they are related to the householder or not. “Total income” is the sum of the amounts reported separately for wage or salary income; net self-employment income; interest, dividends, or net rental or royalty income or income from estates and trusts; social security or railroad retirement income; Supplemental Security Income (SSI); public assistance or welfare payments; retirement, survivor, or disability pensions; and all other income.

$45,000-49,999: The percent of total households that reported $45,000 to $49,999 total income in 1999 or in the previous 12 months prior to filling out the survey between 2010 and 2014. Household income includes the income of the householder and all other individuals 15 years old and over in the household, whether they are related to the householder or not. “Total income” is the sum of the amounts reported separately for wage or salary income; net self-employment income; interest, dividends, or net rental or royalty income or income from estates and trusts; social security or railroad retirement income; Supplemental Security Income (SSI); public assistance or welfare payments; retirement, survivor, or disability pensions; and all other income.

$50,000-59,999: The percent of total households that reported $50,000 to $59,999 total income in 1999 or in the previous 12 months prior to filling out the survey between 2010 and 2014. Household income includes the income of the householder and all other individuals 15 years old and over in the household, whether they are related to the householder or not. “Total income” is the sum of the amounts reported separately for wage or salary income; net self-employment income; interest, dividends, or net rental or royalty income or income from estates and trusts; social security or railroad retirement income; Supplemental Security Income (SSI); public assistance or welfare payments; retirement, survivor, or disability pensions; and all other income.

$60,000-74,999: The percent of total households that reported $60,000 to $74,999 total income in 1999 or in the previous 12 months prior to filling out the survey between 2010 and 2014. Household income includes the income of the householder and all other individuals 15 years old and over in the household, whether they are related to the householder or not. “Total income” is the sum of the amounts reported separately for wage or salary income; net self-employment income; interest, dividends, or net rental or royalty income or income from estates and trusts; social security or railroad retirement income; Supplemental Security Income (SSI); public assistance or welfare payments; retirement, survivor, or disability pensions; and all other income.

$75,000-99,999: The percent of total households that reported $75,000 to $99,999 total income in 1999 or in the previous 12 months prior to filling out the survey between 2010 and 2014. Household income includes the income of the householder and all other individuals 15 years old and over in the household, whether they are related to the householder or not. “Total income” is the sum of the amounts reported separately for wage or salary income; net self-employment income; interest, dividends, or net rental or royalty income or income from estates and trusts; social security or railroad retirement income; Supplemental Security Income (SSI); public assistance or welfare payments; retirement, survivor, or disability pensions; and all other income.

$100,000-124,999: The percent of total households that reported $100,000 to$124,999 total income in 1999 or in the previous 12 months prior to filling out the survey between 2010 and 2014. Household income includes the income of the householder and all other individuals 15 years old and over in the household, whether they are related to the householder or not. “Total income” is the sum of the amounts reported separately for wage or salary income; net self-employment income; interest, dividends, or net rental or royalty income or income from estates and trusts; social security or railroad retirement income; Supplemental Security Income (SSI); public assistance or welfare payments; retirement, survivor, or disability pensions; and all other income.

$125,000-149,999: The percent of total households that reported $125,000 to$149,999 total income in 1999 or in the previous 12 months prior to filling out the survey between 2010 and 2014. Household income includes the income of the householder and all other individuals 15 years old and over in the household, whether they are related to the householder or not. “Total income” is the sum of the amounts reported separately for wage or salary income; net self-employment income; interest, dividends, or net rental or royalty income or income from estates and trusts; social security or railroad retirement income; Supplemental Security Income (SSI); public assistance or welfare payments; retirement, survivor, or disability pensions; and all other income.

$150,000-199,999: The percent of total households that reported $150,000 to$199,999 total income in 1999 or in the previous 12 months prior to filling out the survey between 2010 and 2014. Household income includes the income of the householder and all other individuals 15 years old and over in the household, whether they are related to the householder or not. “Total income” is the sum of the amounts reported separately for wage or salary income; net self-employment income; interest, dividends, or net rental or royalty income or income from estates and trusts; social security or railroad retirement income; Supplemental Security Income (SSI); public assistance or welfare payments; retirement, survivor, or disability pensions; and all other income.

$200,000 or more: The percent of total households that reported $200,000 or more total income in 1999 or in the previous 12 months prior to filling out the survey between 2010 and 2014. Household income includes the income of the householder and all other individuals 15 years old and over in the household, whether they are related to the householder or not. “Total income” is the sum of the amounts reported separately for wage or salary income; net self-employment income; interest, dividends, or net rental or royalty income or income from estates and trusts; social security or railroad retirement income; Supplemental Security Income (SSI); public assistance or welfare payments; retirement, survivor, or disability pensions; and all other income.

Population in poverty

Total population for whom poverty status is determined: Poverty status was determined for all people except institutionalized people, people in military group quarters, people in college dormitories, and unrelated individuals under 15 years old. The Census Bureau uses the federal government’s official poverty definition. To determine a person’s poverty status, one compares the person’s total family income with the poverty threshold appropriate for that person’s family size and composition. If the total income of that person’s family is less than the threshold appropriate for that family, then the person is considered poor, together with every member of his or her family. If a person is not living with anyone related by birth, marriage, or adoption, then the person’s own income is compared with his or her poverty threshold.

People living in poverty: The percent of total population for whom poverty status is determined whose family has income that is lower than the poverty threshold for that size family.

People living at or above poverty: The percent of total population for whom poverty status is determined whose family has income that is at or above the poverty threshold for that size family.

Vehicles available

No vehicle available: The percent of total occupied housing units in which no vehicle is kept at home and available for the use of household members. A vehicle is an automobile, van, or truck of one-ton capacity or less.

1 vehicle available: The percent of total occupied housing units in which one vehicle is kept at home and available for the use of household members. A vehicle is an automobile, van, or truck of one-ton capacity or less.

2 or more vehicles available: The percent of total occupied housing units in which two or more vehicles are kept at home and available for the use of household members. A vehicle is an automobile, van, or truck of one-ton capacity or less.

Type of transportation, workers 16+

Car, truck or van: The percent of total workers 16 years and over who indicated that they usually took a car, truck or van to work during the reference week. The reference week is the calendar week preceding the date on which the respondents completed their questionnaires. If they usually used more than one method of transportation, they indicated the method they used for most of the distance.

Public transportation: The percent of total workers 16 years and over who indicated that they usually took a public bus, streetcar, ferryboat, subway, elevated or railroad to work during the reference week. The reference week is the calendar week preceding the date on which the respondents completed their questionnaires. If they usually used more than one method of transportation, they indicated the method they used for most of the distance.

Bicycle: The percent of total workers 16 years and over who indicated that they usually rode a bicycle to work during the reference week. The reference week is the calendar week preceding the date on which the respondents completed their questionnaires. If they usually used more than one method of transportation, they indicated the method they used for most of the distance.

Walked: The percent of total workers 16 years and over who indicated that they usually walked to work during the reference week. The reference week is the calendar week preceding the date on which the respondents completed their questionnaires. If they usually used more than one method of transportation, they indicated the method they used for most of the distance.

Other means: The percent of total workers 16 years and over who indicated that they usually took a motorcycle, taxicab, or other method (other than car, truck, van, bicycle, walk, streetcar, ferryboat, public bus or other public transportation) to work during the reference week. The reference week is the calendar week preceding the date on which the respondents completed their questionnaires. If they usually used more than one method of transportation, they indicated the method they used for most of the distance. The reference week is the calendar week preceding the date on which the respondents completed their questionnaires. If they usually used more than one method of transportation, they indicated the method they used for most of the distance.

Worked from home: The percent of total workers 16 years and over who indicated that they usually worked from home during the reference week. The reference week is the calendar week preceding the date on which the respondents completed their questionnaires. If they usually used more than one method of transportation, they indicated the method they used for most of the distance. The reference week is the calendar week preceding the date on which the respondents completed their questionnaires. If they usually used more than one method of transportation, they indicated the method they used for most of the distance.

Travel time to work, workers 16+

Average travel time to work: The total travel time to work for workers 16 years and over who did not work at home divided by the number of workers 16 years and over who did not work at home.

Less than 30 minutes: The percent of total workers 16 years and over who did not work at home whose travel time to work was less than 30 minutes. Travel time to work refers to the total number of minutes that it usually took the person to get from home to work each day during the reference week.

30 to 44 minutes: The percent of total workers 16 years and over who did not work at home whose travel time to work was 30 to 44 minutes. Travel time to work refers to the total number of minutes that it usually took the person to get from home to work each day during the reference week.

45 to 59 minutes: The percent of total workers 16 years and over who did not work at home whose travel time to work was 45 to 59 minutes. Travel time to work refers to the total number of minutes that it usually took the person to get from home to work each day during the reference week.

60 or more minutes: The percent of total workers 16 years and over who did not work at home whose travel time to work was 60 minutes or more. Travel time to work refers to the total number of minutes that it usually took the person to get from home to work each day during the reference week.

Level of schooling

Less than 9th grade: The percent of the total population 18 years and over whose highest level of schooling is any grade from nursery school to 9th grade or who have completed no schooling. The question included instructions for people currently enrolled in school to report the level of the previous grade attended or highest degree received.

9th to 12th grade, no diploma: The percent of the total population 18 years and over whose highest level of schooling is any grade from 9th to 12th grade without receiving a high school diploma. The question included instructions for people currently enrolled in school to report the level of the previous grade attended or highest degree received.

High school diploma or GED: The percent of the total population 18 years and over whose highest level of schooling is high school graduate or equivalent (for example, GED). The question included instructions for people currently enrolled in school to report the level of the previous grade attended or highest degree received.

Some college: The percent of the total population 18 years and over whose highest level of schooling is some college credit but no degree. The question included instructions for people currently enrolled in school to report the level of the previous grade attended or highest degree received.

Associate’s degree: The percent of the total population 18 years and over whose highest level of schooling is an associate degree (for example: AA, AS). The question included instructions for people currently enrolled in school to report the level of the previous grade attended or highest degree received.

Bachelor’s degree: The percent of the total population 18 years and over whose highest level of schooling is a bachelor’s degree (for example: BA, AB, BS). The question included instructions for people currently enrolled in school to report the level of the previous grade attended or highest degree received.

Graduate or professional degree: The percent of the total population 18 years and over whose highest level of schooling is a master’s degree (for example: MA, MS, MEng, MEd, MSW, MBA), a professional degree (for example: MD, DDS, DVM, LLB, JD) or a doctorate degree (for example: PhD, EdD). The question included instructions for people currently enrolled in school to report the level of the previous grade attended or highest degree received.

English as a second language

Native English speaker or speaks English as a second language “well” or “very well”: The percent of the total population who indicate that they speak only English at home, PLUS respondents who report that they speak a language other than English at home and also indicate that they speak English “Very well,” or “Well.”

Speaks Spanish at home and speaks English “not well” or “not at all”: The percent of the total population who indicate that they speak Spanish at home and they indicate they speak English “Not well,” or “Not at all.”

Speaks other languages at home and speaks English “not well” or “not at all”: The percent of the total population who indicate that they speak other languages at home and they indicate they speak English “Not well,” or “Not at all.” Other languages include languages such as French, Yiddish, Polish, Hindi, Gujarati, Japanese, Hmong, Korean, Thai, Navajo, Apache, Cherokee, Hungarian, Arabic, Hebrew, African languages, and unspecified languages.

Workers living in the neighborhood by wage level

Total number of workers: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance, living in the neighborhood.

$1,250 per month or less: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood earning less than $1,250 per month.

$1,251 – $3,333 per month: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood earning between $1,251 and $3,333 per month.

More than $3,333 per month: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood earning more than $3,333 per month.

Workers living in the neighborhood by industry sector

Total number of workers: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood.

Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood working in NAICS sector 11, “Agriculture, Forestry, Fishing and Hunting.”

Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood working in NAICS sector 21, “Mining, Quarrying, and Oil and Gas Extraction.”

Utilities: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood working in NAICS sector 22, “Utilities.”

Construction: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood working in NAICS sector 23, “Construction.”

Manufacturing: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood working in NAICS sectors 31-33, “Manufacturing.”

Wholesale Trade: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood working in NAICS sector 42, “Wholesale Trade.”

Retail Trade: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood working in NAICS sectors 44-45, “Retail Trade.”

Transportation and Warehousing: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood working in NAICS sectors 48-49, “Transportation.”

Information: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood working in NAICS sector 51, “Information.”

Finance and Insurance: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood working in NAICS sector 52, “Finance and Insurance.”

Real Estate and Rental and Leasing: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood working in NAICS sector 53, “Real Estate and Rental and Leasing.”

Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood working in NAICS sector 54, “Professional, Scientific, and Technical Services.”

Management of Companies and Enterprises: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood working in NAICS sector 55, “Management of Companies and Enterprises.”

Administration & Support, Waste Management, and Remediation: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood working in NAICS sector 56, “Administration & Support, Waste Management and Remediation.”

Educational Services: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood working in NAICS sector 61, “Educational Services.” Health Care and Social Assistance: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood working in NAICS sector 62, “Health Care and Social Assistance.”

Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood working in NAICS sector 71, “Arts, Entertainment, and Recreation.”

Accommodation and Food Services: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood working in NAICS sector 72, “Accommodation and Food Services.”

Other Services (excluding Public Administration): The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood working in NAICS sector 81, “Other Services (excluding Public Administration).”

Public Administration: The total number of workers covered by unemployment insurance living in the neighborhood working in NAICS sector 92, “Public Administration.”

Source links:

U.S. Census Bureau. Census 2000 (SF1 and SF3), Census 2010 Summary File 1 (SF1), and 2010-2014 American Community Survey.
http://factfinder2.census.gov/faces/nav/jsf/pages/searchresults.xhtml?refresh=t

U.S. Census Bureau. 2004 and 2013 Local Employment Dynamics.
http://onthemap.ces.census.gov/